Past Events

Reform of the regulation of medical practitioners in Hong Kong: a comparison with the UK and Singapore, and the results of a public survey

Category:

Date:

13 Jun, 2013

Time:

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Venue:

Room 403, 4/F, Professorial Block, Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong

Speaker(s):

Dr TK Chan, MBCHB(CUHK), MRCS (England, Edinburgh), LLM(Edinburgh)

Abstract:

A recent incident in which a lady died from a blood transfusion therapy given in a beauty centre has prompted us to reflect on the current regulation of medical practitioners in Hong Kong. Based on a comparison with the current regulation in the United Kingdom and Singapore (both of which have a similar healthcare system to ours), we propose reform in Hong Kong in respect of the constitution of regulators, revalidation of medical professionals, and tackling concerns about medical professionals. We conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey amongst members of the general public of Hong Kong to collect their opinion on our proposed reform. As expected, the majority of the respondents supported all our proposed changes. Accordingly, we strongly call for a change with a view to strengthening the current regulatory framework in order to restore confidence from the public.

Biography of speaker:

Dr Chan graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2005 and qualified as a medical practitioner in Hong Kong in 2006. He completed his basic surgical training and obtained his membership from the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of England and Edinburgh in 2009 and 2010 respectively. His fascination with surgical anatomy brought him to the department of anatomy as a teacher and his interest in medical law and ethics saw him complete the masters of law degree from the University of Edinburgh in 2012. He is keen on critically reviewing current law and ethics from the perspectives of patients.

Governing Biobanks: Challenges and Perspectives

Category:

Date:

30 May, 2013

Time:

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Venue:

Room A825, 8/F, Cheng Yu Tung Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong

Speaker(s):

Dr. Chih-hsing Ho, Centre for Medical Ethics and Law, The University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

Biobanks collect biological samples and associated data for medical research and diagnostic purposes. As contemporary medicine is moving from reactive approaches to predictive, preventive, personalised and participatory medicine (P4 Medicine), biobanks have become powerful tools with the potential to drive this transition in drug innovation and health care delivery. However, the practice of biobanking also raises considerable challenges for existing legal principles and regulatory frameworks. This talk explores these challenges and possible solutions to achieve appropriate governance structures for biobanking in the future.

Distinguished Lecture Series 2013 : Ethical Concerns in Organ Transplantation

Category:

Public Talks

Date:

14 May, 2013

Time:

6:00pm – 7:00pm

Venue:

Cheung Kung Hai Lecture Theatre 2, G/F, William M.W. Mong Block, Faculty of Medicine Building, 21 Sasson Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

Speaker(s):

Professor Sir Roy Calne, FRS

Abstract:

Organ transplantation has led to an unprecedented break with traditional medical ethics, in that under certain carefully defined conditions a normal healthy individual may be harmed.  In addition, the shortage of organ donors has put enormous pressure on health resources by patients and doctors. Even though the gift of an organ is really a ‘gift of life’, to obtain an organ when a donor is not available puts stress on moral values. Even if these ethical matters cannot all be overcome, defining and discussing the moral dilemmas that may arise in organ transplantation is a move toward improving the ethical background in which transplants are performed. Moreover, fostering the culture of charity and compassion in organ donation is probably the most important approach to improving the number of organ transplants.

Problematising the Inevitability of the Epidemiological Transition: Trade, Transnational Food Corporations, and the rapid rise of Non-Communicable Diseases in Low-Income countries

Category:

Public Talks

Date:

30 Apr, 2013

Time:

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Venue:

Room A824, 8/F, Cheng Yu Tung Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong

Speaker(s):

Dr. Paul Kadetz, DPhil (Oxon.), MPH, MSN, MSc. (Oxon.), APRN-BC.

Abstract:

The theory of the epidemiological transition proposes that increases in non-communicable diseases within populations is an inevitable outcome of industrialisation and economic development. However, this presentation will argue that the recent exponential increase of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low-income countries is not an inevitability of “development” per se, but rather a result of the political economy of trade; particularly the trade of transnational food corporations and foreign direct investment in unhealthy and toxic processed commodities. Based upon research concerning malnutrition and diabetes conducted in indigenous Guatemala, this paper demonstrates a correlation between trade, neoliberalisation, urbanisation and the dramatic growth of NCDs in low-income populations. Thereby, world trade in unhealthy food commodities will be critically examined in terms of health ethics and policy making.

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